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Musical Portraits make an impression

The latest in a series of performances that place music at the heart of National Museum Wales, Musical Portraits 3 brings together impressionist artwork and music from the period in which these artists were painting.

Impressionism developed as a movement in painting towards the end of the 19th century and so guests at this concert can expect to hear music which was written and performed during the same era. Works by composers such as Chopin, Liszt, Alkan and John Ireland will all be performed by concert pianist, Kenneth Hamilton.

Kenneth is widely renowned for his skill yet has said that he only began playing because his grandmother happened to have acquired a piano. However, he took to it like a “fish to water.”

Also a writer, broadcaster, and Head of Music at Cardiff University, Kenneth specialises in 19th and 20th century music and has even made several television appearances. His most recent book explores the differences between the past and the present in concert life which are now united in this highly immersive recital.

Kenneth Hamilton has been playing the piano since he was 10 years old and now performs at National Museum Wales

Kenneth Hamilton has been playing the piano since he was 10 years old and now performs at National Museum Wales

Eleri Evans, learning manager at National Museum Wales, explains that the recital, and accompanying talk about the museums extensive impressionist collection, is part of a wider programme which aims to introduce music to the museum.

Events such as the Musical Portraits recital taking place on Friday 2 December are making classical music more accessible in the city. With a low ticket price, and free entry for under 18s and students, there is much to be celebrated in this performance.

Eleri also stressed that, “The museum has been interpreting collections and animating our galleries through music for many years.” This Musical Portraits series is simply the latest step in bringing music to the collection, and a wider audience, in order to get people engaged with more classical arts.

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