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Roath Park: A Welsh confluence of beauty

Looking for a special place to relax? From sightseeing, picnics, to boat riding, Roath is not your ordinary park; it offers several features for different age groups and people with different tastes for nature, all in one area.

 

A bank of swans swims in harmony, their necks stretched out ready for guests, as other wild birds fly overhead across the lake. The pride of the park, the lake, sitting on 30 acres, is just among the many breath-taking sites on Roath Park.

Roath Park is a perfect get-away from the busy life around Cardiff City Centre but short enough for one to walk there in 30 minutes. It is a spot for those looking to experience the unique beauty of nature and to reflect on life.

On the park lake, is a white vertical imposing figure of the Scott memorial light house, which according to Anthony, one of the park rangers, and from the information on one of the park boards, was built to commemorate the fateful voyage of Captain Fober Falcon Scott to the Antarctic in his ship the S.D Terra Nova in 1910. The lake also has a café where one can get refreshments. Above the cafe is a sitting area where one can enjoy the beautiful view of the lake, birds and the gardens.

A view of birds flying over the Roath Park Lake. The lake is one of the major attractions in the park because of its variety of birds.

A view of birds flying over the Roath Park Lake. The lake is one of the major attractions in the park because of its variety of birds.

The Scot Light House memorial on Roath Park Lake, one of the unique features in Roath park. Behind the Light House, is the park cafe from which one can have a great view of the lake and birds.

The Scot Light House memorial on Roath Park Lake, one of the unique features in Roath park. Behind the Light House, is the park cafe from which one can have a great view of the lake and birds.

The spot at which Scot's Terra Nova set off for the Antarctica expedition.

The spot at which Scot’s Terra Nova set off for the Antarctica expedition.

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The Roath Park Wild garden, north of the lake.

The stream through which the lake pours its water into the botanical gardens.

The stream through which the lake pours its water into the botanical gardens.

The lake water finally gets into the botanical gardens and the picnic area, forming a mini falls on the stones. The waves get stronger when the pressure of water from the lake increases.

The lake water finally gets into the botanical gardens and the picnic area, forming a mini falls on the stones. The waves get stronger when the pressure of water from the lake increases.

The lake lets out its water on both sides into the wild gardens in the north, and botanic gardens in the south, with mini waterfalls over concrete and big stones in the streams that connect to the walkways.

Next to the botanic gardens, is the rose garden, oh yeah, a garden of roses! Unfortunately, most of the rose garden was trimmed so we have to wait for them to grow back before we can get a full view of the garden with all its roses. However, it still looks beautiful even without all the roses. A lot of creativity was put in the structure of the garden so, that a lone will keep you gazing for hours. There are benches here and at other points of the park. Regardless of the direction you are coming from, or where you are in the park, you can rest on a bench and take in fresh air and feel the tranquillity of the park.

 

The Roath Park Rose garden was trimmed but it still looks beautiful even without most of its roses.

The Roath Park Rose garden was trimmed but it still looks beautiful even without most of its roses.

The picnic area next to the rose garden. The path down this area leads to the children play area and the conservatory.

The picnic area next to the rose garden. The path down this area leads to the children play area and the conservatory.

 

Roath Park is beautiful and fun, and you don’t need a tour partner to enjoy its beauty or engage in any of its activities. You will find walking jogging, running, fishing, boat ride, sightseeing and sports partners on site. There are hundreds of people who go to the park daily so there will be people to share this great experience with. And if you have children, don’t leave them behind, there is a play area where they can have fun with other children. And oh yeah, an ice cream kiosk for both children and adults to lick away as they enjoy the beauty of the park.

As you prepare to have fun in this very big park, remember not to carry bread for the birds, it is considered junk. The information board gives a directive for visitors who want to feed birds to get food from the conservatory. And when hungry, do not eat where the swans are, they will come closer and surround you thinking you want to share your meal with them. You wouldn’t want to end up in a chase game with the swans, it would be very dramatic, but no worries, they are very friendly; they won’t harm you.

Ibn Battuta, one of the greatest travellers of all time, says: “Traveling – it leaves you speechless, then turns you into a storyteller.” Break from your routine and experience the beauty that is Roath Park.

The Roath Park children play area admits children below age 14.

Parents watch their children play in the Roath Park play area, which admits children below age 14. To the right of the play area, is a path that leads tourists to the lake and ice cream kiosk.

Anthony, a Roath Park ranger cheerfully explains the history of the Scot Light House.

Anthony, a Roath Park ranger cheerfully explains the history of the Scot Light House on the Roath Park Lake.