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Will futuristic violins reach Cardiff?

Cardiff Violins says traditional instruments are still in demand due to sound quality

As musicians and music lovers celebrate Violin Day on 13 December, a new range of 3Dvarius, the first fully playable 3D printed and electric violin is set to go out into the market.

The 3Dvarius is a transparent violin manufactured as a single piece using 3D printing technology. It is produced in limited edition with the next series scheduled for release at the end of December 2016.

Although the printed violin’s innovative shape is inspired by a traditional fiddle, the design elements are more aesthetic which makes it lighter and more precise so as to not hinder a player’s movements.

The stylish 3Dvarius is based on the model of an original Stradivarius violin, first created by master Italian craftsman Antonio Stradivari in the 17th century.

The word violin originates from the Latin word 'vital', meaning stringed instrument

The word violin originates from the Latin word ‘vital’, meaning stringed instrument

A genuine Stradivarius can command anything from a few thousand pounds to a few million. In 2011, a 1721 Stradivarius violin was sold for £9.8 million at a charity auction in London to raise money for tsunami disaster relief in Japan.

The new version of the 3Dvarius will retail for £6,999. In comparison, a basic wooden string violin in the UK costs in upwards of £50.

Cardiff Violins says traditional instruments are still in demand due to sound quality

Cardiff Violins says traditional instruments are still in demand due to sound quality

Although pre-orders for the new printed violins can now be made online, Chris King of Cardiff Violins says none of the amateur violinists, professionals or students his store caters to have made any enquiries for printed violins. “Nobody has come in requesting 3D violins yet. People that enter in here are still looking for classical violins. They are preferred because of their sound,” affirms Chris, the co-director of Wales largest violin shop.

A spokesperson at The Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama also confirms that students at the college still use the traditional string instruments due to concern for the tone and quality of sound.

The College has no definite plans thus far to celebrate National Violin Day.

 

 

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